1. Someone asked for a list of songs, arbitrarily numbered, then didn’t post the list. And so:

    1. Rhye: “The Fall (Maurice Fulton Alt Mix)”
    2. Drake: “Hold On We’re Going Home”
    3. Leisure Connection: Jungle Dancing
    4. Disclosure: Help Me Lose My Mind (ft. London Grammar)
    5. Jeremy Greenspan: “Drums&Drums&Drums” / “Sirius Shake”
    6. Syclops: Sarah’s E With Extra P
    7. Beautiful Swimmers: Big Coast
    8. Kurt Vile: KV Crimes
    9. Insanlar: Kime Ne
    10. Kyle Hall: Crushed
    11. Sky Ferreira: Nobody Asked Me (If I Was Okay)
    12. James Blake: Retrograde
    13. Hubbabubbaklubb: Mopedbart
    14. Todd Terje: “Strandbar (disko)”
    15. Factory Floor: “Fall Back”
    16. Theo Parrish & Tony Allen: Day Like This
    17. Stellar Om Source: “Elite Excel” (Kassem Mosse Remix)
    18. Âme: “Erkki”
    19. Terekke: “Amaze”
    20. Oneohtrix Point Never: “Zebra”
    21. David Bowie: “Love Is Lost (Hello Steve Reich Mix by James Murphy)”
    22. Torn Hawk: Born to Win (Life After Ghostbusters)
    23. DJ Fett Burger: Disco Tre
    24. Bill Callahan: Small Plane
    25. Autre Ne Veut: Play by Play
    26. Funkinevil: “Ignorant”
    27. Huerco S.: “Apheleia’s Theme”
    28. James Holden: “The Illuminations (12” Version)”
    29. Kelela: “Enemy”
    30. DJ Sotofett Presents Fran Benitez:  Lagrimas Negras

    8 months ago  /  3 notes

  2. "There comes a moment deep into your gig when you just don’t care, you just play whatever you want to hear, in whatever sequence pleases you in that moment. Your mix becomes a riddle that nobody will bother to understand." Hua

    11 months ago  /  1 note

  3. “I am sympathetic to what he sees as the horror of the world [and] what he imagines could come. I want to communicate that with as much resonance as possible. If I were to sit and do endless cable interviews — all those things alienate me from what I need to stay connected to. It’s not just a scoop. It’s someone’s life.”

    1 year ago  /  0 notes

  4. The style that I eventually fell into is more focused than people would actually imagine. There’s physicality and also nearly a meditative stillness to it. You have to be right there in the moment to do it, otherwise it’s just gratuitous chord-bending that sounds like nothing.

    1 year ago  /  1 note

  5. aquariumdrunkard:

Macca / 80

    aquariumdrunkard:

    Macca / 80

    1 year ago  /  28 notes  /  Source: aquariumdrunkard

  6. He had also got involved with meditation, citing it as “a form of [Devo’s theory of] de-evolution because it takes you from the physical to the conscious to the super-conscious. I’ve found that the purpose of having a body is to show that the physical world is an illusion.”

    He had also got involved with meditation, citing it as “a form of [Devo’s theory of] de-evolution because it takes you from the physical to the conscious to the super-conscious. I’ve found that the purpose of having a body is to show that the physical world is an illusion.”

    1 year ago  /  3 notes

  7. 1 year ago  /  6 notes

  8. The Doors of Perception.

    The Doors of Perception.

    1 year ago  /  5 notes

  9. About Burial:

    KH: It’s fun knowing that I’ve got some power in line that I can play around with those things in really quick, fun sorts of ways and I can throw bits of music out very very fast to big audiences. I know that. I believe that good music has so much strength. When I did the last thing with Burial, that track “Nova”, it was like, “I know this is one of the best things I’ve ever ever done.” I was so proud of that. I knew that to have the combination of all the buzz you can create online, combined with a piece of music that’s really really great, once that’s going you can do something amazing. At the moment when I put that on SoundCloud I did it at the stupidest time I could be up, at like 2 am on a Sunday knowing that every journalist that might care would definitely be asleep and miss it. But you could see the mad people who were awake at that time like, “Oh my God!”

    Are you ever sort of seduced by that, by Burial’s total anonymity? That for him the music is literally all he does?

    KH: I’m envious of the fact that it’s so pure, that it’s so perfectly music driven. I think that anybody that’s able to —especially for other musicians— see someone for whom it’s 100% music, there’s not anything else, that’s a challenge. It takes a very strong willed person to be able to do that. So I think it’s hard not be envious of that aspect of it.

    Working with Burial and seeing what he did definitely went beyond musical inspiration. The effect that it had of him being anonymous, I don’t think anybody anticipated quite how powerful it would be. Even in the face of winning big music awards and things like that, to see that was definitely inspiring, definitely a reminder to me to think about what I do really care about. The idea of removing things from the music world that I don’t want to deal with made total sense in light of that.

     

     

    1 year ago  /  4 notes

  10. Today, a re-assessment of Four Tet’s 2003 album, Rounds. A week prior, a long chat with Kieran Hebden about the making of that album, which as it turns out, was built entirely on samples. Ten years prior, the initial jazzbo-namedropping review.

    Today, a re-assessment of Four Tet’s 2003 album, Rounds. A week prior, a long chat with Kieran Hebden about the making of that album, which as it turns out, was built entirely on samples. Ten years prior, the initial jazzbo-namedropping review.

    1 year ago  /  74 notes