1. "In the Japanese language, subjects are left out of the sentence, so that one does not speak of the actions of “I” or “You” or “Him” or “Her,” but rather of the existence of a certain mood, a certain feeling, that is shared among many. To say “I” too much in Japanese sounds selfish and rude, like a three-year-old child shouting “Me want this, me want that” all the time. That’s hard for us to understand here in America. I mean, isn’t the subject the most important part?"

    "In the Japanese language, subjects are left out of the sentence, so that one does not speak of the actions of “I” or “You” or “Him” or “Her,” but rather of the existence of a certain mood, a certain feeling, that is shared among many. To say “I” too much in Japanese sounds selfish and rude, like a three-year-old child shouting “Me want this, me want that” all the time. That’s hard for us to understand here in America. I mean, isn’t the subject the most important part?"

    3 years ago  /  0 notes